Glasgow - City of Sculpture
By Gary Nisbet
John Thomas Emmett
(1828-98)
A London architect, best known for his Gothic churches there and in Glasgow.

He designed the New Independent Church, Bath Street (1849-52, later St. Mathew Blythswood, now Renfield St. Stephen), which was rebuilt in 2001, after its tall spire collapsed onto the church during the great Boxing Day storm of 1998; and also designed the spireless Sandyford Henderson Memorial Church, 13 Kelvinhaugh Street (1854-6), which was completed by John Honeyman from Emmett's plans.

Restored in 2003-5, the church features an extensive array of corbel heads and animals on its exterior, including a bat, and capital heads in its interior.

Emmett was also responsible for designing the Pastor George Black Monument for the Necropolis (1851), which was originally surmounted by a tall, Gothic canopy carved by John Mossman , until its removal shortly afterwards due to structural problems.

His London work includes the Congregational College in St. Johnís Wood (1849).

Emmett was also a writer and published The New Courts of Law, 1867, and The State of English Architecture, 1872, in the Quarterly Review, and Six Essays, in 1891.


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